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0-10 volts Vrs. 4-20mA

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  • 0-10 volts Vrs. 4-20mA

    I am getting ready to spec out a project with an analog prox (AM9-10-1H) and DL-06 Analog input module (F0-04AD-1 4-20mA input module or F0-04AD-2 0-10 Volt input).

    The sensor will give 4-20mA or 0-10VDC. The current input module is a few bucks cheaper, but this is not a big factor

    Is there any disadvantage to using 4-20mA?

    Am I correct in thinking that the 4-20 signal is less sensitive to noise?

    Are there any advantages to choosing 0-10 VDC?

    Thanks in advance for any advice.

    Kip


  • #2
    4-20 ma is more immune to noise, and more reliable over distance.
    I don't know that there are any advantages to 0-10 volt.
    I use 4-20 on everything if I can.
    Circumstances don't determine who we are, they only reveal it.
    Jason Wolthuis

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    • #3
      If you have the opportunity, you should nearly always pick 4-20ma. As plcnut says, it is much more immune to noise and can travel farther without losing integrity.
      If you have an urgent issue, please contact AutomationDirect's Technical Support team.

      AutomationDirect.com Technical Support: 1(800) 633-0405 or (770) 844-4200 Email Tech Support

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      • #4
        Thanks for the responses. I will go with 4-20.

        Kip

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        • #5
          Another reason to use 0-10v is because it is easier to test. You can just use a volt meter to test the signal, where on a 4-20mA signal you have to disconnect a wire and put your meter in series.

          An easy way around this is to route all of your 4-20mA signals through a terminal block with a disconnect like these:

          http://www.automationdirect.com/stat...pprotector.pdf

          This way you can easily put your meter in series without having to disconnect any wiring.

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          • #6
            4-20mA is a better way to go, but in my case, my runs are not that far. 0-10v works better at our plant. It is easier for maintenance to use a voltmeter to see the signal. We can not be down for large amounts of time so the 0-10v works better for us. If you do make long runs, then maybe the 4-20ma is the way to go. I use 0-10v because it is easier and faster to trouble shoot.

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            • #7
              I have a Mix of both here. As stated 4-20 is more robust, 0-10 if faster to troubleshoot..
              For my 0-10 Volt Lines that are bothered by Noise ( Running next to or into a VFD! ), I will hang a 35 Volt 1,000 MF ( or So ) capicator on the Destination end of the Line.. it smooths out the noise, and so far has not lead to any percevable induced troubles..

              Cap

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              • #8
                It has been awhile since on the factory floor. But as I recall, the 4-20mA
                circuit(s) can be daisy chained. This may not be an issue with the OP, just wanted to mention that.

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                • #9
                  These are couple advantage 4-20ma over 0-10V.
                  0V could be signal at lower level or Circuit in short.
                  10V could be signal at max level or Circuit is open.
                  Bellow 4ma, short circuit.
                  Above 20ma, Open circuit.
                  With 4-20ma is easy to set alarm level to know if circuit is open or short.

                  As mentioned before:
                  4-20ma signal less susceptible to noise.
                  4-20ma not susceptible to voltage drop on long rung wires.

                  Regarding test the 4-20ma; if you check the resistance on the module receiving the signal, just apply ohms law and create a table V=I*R. So it will be easy to check voltage which correspond to the 4-20ma.
                  Ej: If PLC analog input resistance is 200ohms then 4ma = 0.8V 20ma=4V.

                  Hope it help,

                  Philip

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