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    So I just been playing trying to learn the applications for my eventual program. In this program example,C1 is triggering t1to start the process on the down fall.
    C2,C3 are enabling/disabling the rung.
    The basis of the program,Master timer controls overall cycle, Delay timers allow my press to close, and inject timers run my solenoids.
    The problem i am having, is t4 t5, do not start counting until t1 turns off.What am i missing? Do the off delay timers need to see a input turning off?
    I am playing with the cmorre as well, I got that part whipped tho.
    Attached Files

  • #2
    Interestingly enough, I've never used an off-delay timer in my life. That probably stems from the fast that some of the first PLC's I used only had on-delay timers (and you used to program them with a hand-held programmer and save your program to cassette tape) :-P

    With T1 one, (assuming C2 and C3 are on), T2 and T3 will come on.

    With T2 and T3 on, C4 and C5 will be on as well. Both those bits are attached to off-delay timers which start timing when they go off (which won't happen until T1 goes off).

    If all your timing events occur within the time of T1, you can simplify this to use one timer and then comparative contacts to just look at time ranges to determine if an output should be on or off.

    When you start mixing timing results and bit states things get more difficult to troubleshoot.

    Do you have a timing diagram on when your output should come on?

    You can also look at the DRUM instruction (which I never use but it can make things very simple in some cases).

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    • #3
      so an on/delay needs to see the bit on to run.
      then counts and turns on.

      off/delay needs to see the bit turn of . then counts and turns off.

      I know how i need them to cycle, i do not have a timing diagram. i will try and draw one.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Baitjunkys View Post
        so an on/delay needs to see the bit on to run.
        then counts and turns on.

        off/delay needs to see the bit turn of . then counts and turns off.

        I know how i need them to cycle, i do not have a timing diagram. i will try and draw one.
        Yes sir:

        On-delay - Timer starts when enable goes high. Timer value starts at setpoint and then output comes on when it reaches 0 and stays on as long as enable is on.
        Off-delay - Timer starts when enable goes off (output goes on). Timer value starts at 0 and output goes off when it exceeds set value.

        Do you have a Click to test on yet?

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        • #5
          yes, i was just looking at it like my mechanical timers, you always have to have power in.

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          • #6
            I appreciate all the help, I'm really enjoying trying to figure this out. I have not seen any videos on sub programming, is there any out there? with all the stuff my end program will have going on, i could see sub programming being beneficial possibly.

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            • #7
              Subroutines in the Click are basic, no built in parameter passing. About the only concept which may not be obvious is that outputs (Y or C) remain in their last state if the Subroutine is no longer called. If you use conditional calling be aware of this behavior.
              thePLCguy

              Bernie

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              • #8
                Glad you're having fun It's an odd little language but definitely has its uses and is extremely common in just about any industrial machinery with a controller of some type.

                For subroutines, they can also come in handy even if you just want to break down your main program into smaller parts but still have it act like it's one continuous program. Just 'call' your subroutine continuously with no conditions. Wherever you call the sub it will just execute that ladder code and then come back when it left off.

                Once you get into calling subroutines with a condition, things can get a little more hairy with timers, bits like Bernie mentioned, etc..

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                • #9
                  here is a bit of what my click is going to replace. all tho, i will not be running pids via click. i will be using my TD1 value to disable power to my pids with math. so if something does get side tracked or they get left on. they will shut off. ill have to resize.

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                  • #10
                    Here is the control face.
                    Attached Files

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                    • #11
                      Here is the guts.
                      Attached Files

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                      • #12
                        Im Using a cmore EA9-T10WCL, I really am not sure why there is a 650.00 price difference between it and a std. Has me stumped.
                        And the click CO10-ARE-D

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          The following Click Series will explain the basics of PLC programming.
                          https://accautomation.ca/series/click-plc/
                          Example:
                          Timers / Counters
                          https://accautomation.ca/click-plc-timers-and-counters/
                          Subroutines
                          https://accautomation.ca/click-plc-p...-instructions/

                          Here is also a series on the C-More that you may find helpful for specific tasks:
                          https://accautomation.ca/series/c-mo...-series-panel/

                          Regards,
                          Garry

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