Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Persistant V1 error on P2-32TD2P

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts


  • Persistant V1 error on P2-32TD2P

    I'm starting out with a P2000 and can not get rid of the V1 error on the P2-32TD2P. I'm using the ZipLink forty position breakout, along with the handy '32TD2P' label strip.
    I know this is Circuits 1 kind of stuff but connecting 24v+ to the noted V1/2/3/4 pins does not get rid of the V1 error. I've tried one pin, I've connected all four pins.
    The V1 error persists. By using Input Simulator and a few rungs I can get the display of the 32TD2P to change outputs, but this is not reflected in any multimeter measurement.
    Tried tech support, they told me to connect 24v+, which I'd tried already and had explained. The system is powered by the same Rhino 24V power supply that the P2K's supply runs on.
    Thanks in advance for any help with this.


  • #2
    Do you have another ZIPLINK cable to try -- or another 32TD2P to try.

    Comment



    • #3
      1) Unplug your connector from the P2-32TD2P module.
      2) Leave the ZL 40 pin module plugged in with power on it.
      3) Use your meter to check pin 6 on the unplugged end.
      4) You should have 24 VDC there. If you do not ohm out the cable.
      5) If you do have 24VDC RA the module.

      Comment



      • #4
        Thanks for replying on this. I tried what was suggested and could not get 24V. Nothing made sense. I unhooked everything and pin by pin verified the cable. When doing the same to the ZipLink block, half of the first twenty pins were no connection. I didn't even finish, I took a screwdriver to the block and found that the although the soldering & board looked tidy, the screw terminals did not conduct to the trace level.
        "Things are never so bad they can't be made worse." Humphrey Bogart
        I'll do an RA. Thanks again for the help.

        Comment



        • #5
          Maybe the Zipblock was the problem and maybe not. I rewired my whole trainer and am now using a Zip pigtail. With the card's +24V going to 24v, and the commons going to ground, V1 error is gone. But output is ~+24V regardless of output state, and all outputs show unconnected alarm.

          But isn't this the wrong way around? This is a sourcing card, shouldn't common be to negative? Yet when I do that the V1 light comes on, and output goes to ~+14V regardless of output state. No outputs have the unconnected alarm.

          Is there some configuration I need to do? As mentioned, I can change output states on the 32TD via input simulator.

          Comment



          • #6
            I never thought I'd be so happy to see a light turn on: wiring it up by the schematic, ignoring textbook stuff, and connecting a load made it work. The output hangs on 24V+ constantly, whether on or off, even with a fake pulldown, I thought something was cooking. Finally got the meter out of there and hooked up the LED half of a button.

            Thanks for hanging in there.

            Comment



            • #7
              The fun continues, I got the LED to light on/off but it never fully turns "off".
              I think this has to do with the load checking functionality of the output module.
              To clarify:
              * Power is off, the LED is off
              * Power is on, LED is on at 1/50th (eyeball approximation)
              * Input is on, LED is on %100
              * Input is off, LED is on at 1/50th

              I checked amperage after the LED and it's something around .0001A between the system being on or off. Not much to measure, with my meter anyway. The LED on is more like 0.014A
              The LED being on while off (1/50th) corresponds directly with the load lamp when the module is in 'Output Check' mode. LED disconnected, LED off, load error on. LED connected, LED 1/50, load error off. No data when input is on.

              Wondering if there's a way to disable the Load Check function. Or, and this makes no sense to me on an output, but do I need a whacky output-side pulldown resistor to get the LED to turn off?

              For reference my hookups are basically this:
              +24V to module +24V
              GND to module common
              Output pin to an AC LED to ammeter to module common

              Comment



              • #8
                I cornered a few EE's and asked if this sounded familiar, and indeed there is an (other brand) of PLC that did the same thing. The idea that off wasn't really off had messed with an output, they had to put a relay in there or something. I could transistorize stuff I guess, seems goofy to have to do that for a mere light though.

                Comment



                • #9
                  Conspicuously absent from their specifications is "leakage current" or "off-state current"...most solid state output modules have this specified in the literature. Often, the leakage current is enough to dimly light an LED. I have even seen instances where it was enough to keep some tiny terminal block sized relays from opening once energized and then de-energized.

                  Comment



                  • #10
                    Originally posted by OkiePC View Post
                    Conspicuously absent from their specifications is "leakage current" or "off-state current"...most solid state output modules have this specified in the literature. Often, the leakage current is enough to dimly light an LED. I have even seen instances where it was enough to keep some tiny terminal block sized relays from opening once energized and then de-energized.
                    I remember hanging lamps and/or resistors off A-B PLC-2 AC output cards -- eons ago.

                    Comment



                    • #11
                      Wow, that is -insane- that this is normal.
                      Does AD have an output board where off is off? (Not a relay board)
                      I could care less about the "Open Load" functionality. If the load doesn't work with a force then I'll figure it out.

                      Comment



                      • #12
                        Originally posted by jefm View Post
                        Wow, that is -insane- that this is normal.
                        Does AD have an output board where off is off? (Not a relay board)
                        I could care less about the "Open Load" functionality. If the load doesn't work with a force then I'll figure it out.
                        If you are responding to me, I was talking about A-B, not A-D.
                        If you are responding to Paul, this is inherent in 'most' semiconductor outputs. In my experience, it was more pronounced in semiconductor AC outputs.
                        NOT limited to AD stuff.

                        Comment



                        • #13
                          Sorry for being vague, kewakl.
                          I was asking if A-D had a binary output board.
                          But I think I have a workaround. I think this issue warrants a thead of it's own, I'll start that up after figuring some things out.
                          Thanks again all.

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X