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Productivity alarm function

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  • Productivity alarm function

    I am currently using the built-in alarm function block for my project, but I have made a few tweaks to make it fit how we have historically had our alarms behave. One thing we've done in the past was only used less/greater than for an alarm condition, so if a low alarm was set at 2, and the measurement was 2, it would not trip the alarm. It would have to be 1.99 to trip it. I would find it convenient to be able to select that as a checkbox option in the alarm instruction.

    The other thing we typically do is latch our alarms. They will remain active until they are acknowledged. If an alarm has cleared its alarm state when acknowledge is pressed, they clear from being in alarm. If they have not cleared it, they remain in alarm. They will stay there until the acknowledge button is pressed again, and will clear if they are no longer in alarm, or remain if they are in alarm.


  • #2
    Originally posted by cshoopman View Post
    I am currently using the built-in alarm function block for my project, but I have made a few tweaks to make it fit how we have historically had our alarms behave. One thing we've done in the past was only used less/greater than for an alarm condition, so if a low alarm was set at 2, and the measurement was 2, it would not trip the alarm. It would have to be 1.99 to trip it. I would find it convenient to be able to select that as a checkbox option in the alarm instruction.

    The other thing we typically do is latch our alarms. They will remain active until they are acknowledged. If an alarm has cleared its alarm state when acknowledge is pressed, they clear from being in alarm. If they have not cleared it, they remain in alarm. They will stay there until the acknowledge button is pressed again, and will clear if they are no longer in alarm, or remain if they are in alarm.
    You may want to look at using the CMPV instruction. It will act as you are describing and it has an equal to status bit. You would still have to latch a bit off of the status bits.

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    • #3
      I've used a CMP instruction, with latching from an NO on the same tag that's on the OUT instruction.

      I was just hoping I could put the ALM function to use. It could possibly save 3 rungs of code. I haven't the slightest clue how easy it is to tweak one of those pre-built instructions, nor how much demand there is for it.

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      • #4
        Not the CMP instruction. The CMPV output instruction. They are 2 different instructions.

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        • #5
          I looked at CMPV, but it appeared to require its own rung as it is an instruction all the way to the right. Then I would need a second rung for the latching. Is that correct, or am I misunderstanding CMPV?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by cshoopman View Post
            I am currently using the built-in alarm function block for my project, but I have made a few tweaks to make it fit how we have historically had our alarms behave. One thing we've done in the past was only used less/greater than for an alarm condition, so if a low alarm was set at 2, and the measurement was 2, it would not trip the alarm. It would have to be 1.99 to trip it. I would find it convenient to be able to select that as a checkbox option in the alarm instruction.
            Using the CMPV was referring to this part of your post.

            Originally posted by cshoopman View Post
            The other thing we typically do is latch our alarms. They will remain active until they are acknowledged. If an alarm has cleared its alarm state when acknowledge is pressed, they clear from being in alarm. If they have not cleared it, they remain in alarm. They will stay there until the acknowledge button is pressed again, and will clear if they are no longer in alarm, or remain if they are in alarm.
            As I stated earlier you would still have to latch a bit.

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