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  • Curious

    What is this chip clocked at? is it a FPGA?
    I have always wanted a Arduino with hardened IO.
    NEAT STUFF!!

  • #2
    Until they say different, I will assume a SAM D21.
    The only references that I can find state is that it mimics the MKRZero which is powered by a SAMD21.

    link to a SAMD21 - I am not implying that this is the exact model/variant


    [EDIT] the manual indicates Atmel SAMD21G18 Ch2 Pg3
    Last edited by kewakl; 01-30-2020, 10:58 AM.

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    • #3
      https://facts-engineering.github.io/.../P1AM-100.html
      It's clocked at 48MHZ

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      • #4

        The P1AM is not an FPGA, but you can get an Intel Cyclone FPGA in an Arduino MKR form factor board. Since this says compatible with MKR boards, that should mean you can hook this FPGA up to it.
        https://store.arduino.cc/usa/mkr-vidor-4000

        Off Topic: Seeing this stuff and how the chips and this FPGA have pins configurable for PWM to control motors with can go well into the MHz range, it makes me wonder yet again why PLCs, Steppers, and Servo drives are so hamstrung by stuch low outputs. No one goes above 1-2MHz, yet it seems the control chips are easily capable of such and even cheap basic ethernet and usb cables are capable of handling hundred of MHz on them. Why will no one make an HSO with 50 MHz output channels and a servo that can take such an input? Using some last gen servos had over 1 million pulse per revolution, and some new gen ones have 16 million per revolution. Hook that up to any gearbox and you cant do very good control with any HSO any more.
        Last edited by MikeN; 01-30-2020, 11:09 AM.

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        • #5
          kewakl is correct - It's the SAMD21G18 just like the MKRZero.

          Clock is at 48MHz. The IO modules are controlled by the Base Controller on the P1AM-100 that interfaces with the SAMD21 via SPI.

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          • #6

            Originally posted by MikeN View Post
            The P1AM is not an FPGA, but you can get an Intel Cyclone FPGA in an Arduino MKR form factor board. Since this says compatible with MKR boards, that should mean you can hook this FPGA up to it.
            https://store.arduino.cc/usa/mkr-vidor-4000
            The left side is intended for shields, though as all the Base Controller pins are present on that header you can technically interface with it bypassing, aside from an enable pin, the SAMD21.
            I did this once or twice during development, but I can't guarantee functionality with a wide variety of boards. There may be other caveats with individual boards and their power pins.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by MikeN View Post
              Off Topic: Seeing this stuff and how the chips and this FPGA have pins configurable for PWM to control motors with can go well into the MHz range, it makes me wonder yet again why PLCs, Steppers, and Servo drives are so hamstrung by stuch low outputs. No one goes above 1-2MHz, yet it seems the control chips are easily capable of such and even cheap basic ethernet and usb cables are capable of handling hundred of MHz on them. Why will no one make an HSO with 50 MHz output channels and a servo that can take such an input? Using some last gen servos had over 1 million pulse per revolution, and some new gen ones have 16 million per revolution. Hook that up to any gearbox and you cant do very good control with any HSO any more.
              Multiple reasons. Opto-isolation at those speeds is hard/expensive. Switching 1/2 amp outs is near impossible. Assuming you could handle the first two, are you expecting single count accuracy from a trapezoidal or S-curve profile? Doing that at that rate with a low-cost microcontroller is next to impossible. Plan on doing that coordinated on more than one channel? Not happening.

              To the extent that these thing can be done, most users aren't willing to pay what it would cost. There is a reason that motion controllers are expensive.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by MikeN View Post
                The P1AM is not an FPGA, but you can get an Intel Cyclone FPGA in an Arduino MKR form factor board. Since this says compatible with MKR boards, that should mean you can hook this FPGA up to it.
                https://store.arduino.cc/usa/mkr-vidor-4000

                Off Topic: Seeing this stuff and how the chips and this FPGA have pins configurable for PWM to control motors with can go well into the MHz range, it makes me wonder yet again why PLCs, Steppers, and Servo drives are so hamstrung by stuch low outputs. No one goes above 1-2MHz, yet it seems the control chips are easily capable of such and even cheap basic ethernet and usb cables are capable of handling hundred of MHz on them. Why will no one make an HSO with 50 MHz output channels and a servo that can take such an input? Using some last gen servos had over 1 million pulse per revolution, and some new gen ones have 16 million per revolution. Hook that up to any gearbox and you cant do very good control with any HSO any more.
                If you're doing a lot of motion and you're not using EtherCAT you're missing out. The motion controller platform I use is about 1" wide and can handle 64 EtherCAT axes. Out of the box it takes under 5 minutes to get things moving once you apply 24V.

                PLC's are great for a lot of tasks but motion control is not one of them compared to a real motion controller.

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                • #9
                  It is neat stuff. I ordered the starter kit to play with. I am a PLC guy and been wanting to dabble with the cheap microcontrollers.
                  Danny Deaton
                  D&D Service and Design

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