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Some P1AM-PROTO Boards I'm Working On

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  • Some P1AM-PROTO Boards I'm Working On

    I designed three boards last week to fit inside the P1AM-PROTO enclosure. I received the boards back today.

    Using the Eagle library for the P1AM-PROTO I built from the original P1AM-PROTO Gerbers, my boards fit inside the enclosure and the header pins appear to be well aligned with where they're supposed to be.

    In the first photo, the top half shows my board fitting inside the disassembled P1AM-PROTO enclosure. The bottom half from left to right shows the three boards I designed.

    The first board is a kitchen sink board. it has RS-485, a small LED display, two relay outputs, two optically-isolated inputs, and a Microchip EUI-48 serial EEPROM. This will likely get installed in my garage to turn the overhead lights inside the garage and a door open light inside the house on and off.

    The second board is just RS-485 and a Microchip EUI-48 serial EEPROM. It's going to be a hardened version of the DMX light controller I built last month based on an Adafruit Feather M0.

    The third board is a bit of stretch. It was designed to build a Halloween prop controller that could supplement the stock P1000 I/O modules with DMX-512 lighting control and sound effects. It has RS-485 and a TI I2S audio DAC and a Microchip EUI-48 serial EEPROM. The RS-485 port can interface to DMX lights. The audio DAC is the stretch part. I've never used this audio DAC before, I've never used the I2S interface on the ATSAMD21 before, I have some concerns about the max bitrate I can read files off the uSD card on the P1AM-100, and finally, I have concerns about not stalling out the audio while updating lighting effects, listening to the input models, and updating the output modules. This might require some creativity or replacing the Arduino bootloader and going straight to Microchips's ASF libraries to get working.

    The second photo is a front view of the UI and IO on the front edge of the kitchen sink board.

    The third photo is a top view of the UI and IO on the front edge of the kitchen sink board.

    I'll try to remember to update this thread as I move forward with the projects.

    -Glen

    Click image for larger version

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  • #2
    This is pretty awesome!

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    • #3
      Dude...Nice Job! Please keep us posted on your progress.

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      • #4
        I stuffed the PCB Friday night after work. Unfortunately Digi-Key was out of the Microchip serial EEPROM last week so I'm going to have to solder that one in later. The hardest part of assembling the board was keeping the headers aligned and perpendicular to the board while soldering them in place.

        Here's the front view:

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        And here's a shot of the board:

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        I'll get more into the functionality and design of the board on my blog in a week or two once the hardware and software are finished but real quick:
        1. Up top is a TI SN65HVD11 half-duplex RS-485 driver along with an RJ-45 jack, a termination resistor, and ESD protection circuitry for the RS-485 interface.
        2. Below that is a four character 5x7 dot matrix LED display in a right-angle socket.
        3. Below that are two relays for the relay outputs. They're SPST / NO / 1 Form A.
        4. Below that are the two optically-isolated inputs and their circuitry. There's an isolated five-volt supply for use with the optocouplers or the optocouplers can be driven from an external power source depending on the configuration of the red jumpers
        I brought up the display first. Some static text on the workbench:

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        Then a scrolling Hello, world! message after boot:

        https://twitter.com/bikerglen/status...76082654547968

        Then a test setup to stimulate the isolated inputs, monitor the relay outputs, and verify the tx capability of the RS-485 port. I also pasted in some basic Ethernet web server and uSD card code to make sure nothing I did on my daughter card broke the Ethernet functionality on the P1AM-ETH or the uSD card functionality on the P1AM-100.

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        And a closeup of everything connected:

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        The remaining items to test:

        RS-485 receive capability.
        The serial EEPROM once the order arrives.

        I think tomorrow I'm going to work on some software to try turn this into something somewhat useful involving one of the inputs, the LED display, and the Ethernet port.

        -Glen





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        • #5
          Originally posted by bikerglen View Post
          The hardest part of assembling the board was keeping the headers aligned and perpendicular to the board while soldering them in place.
          The trick I found when I was assembling boards was to mount it to a completed board(like pictured) so I could solder my anchor points. I double check alignment by plugging it in to the CPU after those and then was good to go.
          Click image for larger version

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          • #6
            There's some thinking! Thanks for the tip!

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            • #7
              Originally posted by FACTS_ENG_TEAM1 View Post

              The trick I found when I was assembling boards was to mount it to a completed board(like pictured) so I could solder my anchor points. I double check alignment by plugging it in to the CPU after those and then was good to go.
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              Similar to how I began the header soldering for my plug-in cards for the Uno R3.
              Last edited by kewakl; 03-19-2020, 06:40 AM.

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              • #8
                Yesterday I soldered the Microchip serial EEPROM on my board. Kind of tough getting in between the headers with the soldering iron but I got it soldered down successfully. It worked! This evening, I decided to try out audio with the P1AM-100. That worked too! Anybody every use a PLC to play audio from a micro SD card before?

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                This is a small breakout board for the TI PCM5100A DAC connected to the PLC. I found the ArduinoSound library which has a function that reads a wave file off a SD card and sends it out over I2S. Since I proven the sound hardware, I'll stuff the prop controller board over the weekend. Then it'll be time to work on the software some and see if theirs any bandwidth left for doing other things while the wave file plays out.

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                • #9
                  Documentation of the 2 in, 2 out, RS-485, display, MAC address board: https://bikerglen.com/blog/p1am-100-...dd-on-modules/

                  Quick video demonstrating its use to monitor my garage door and turn the overhead lights on and off whenever the door is opened or closed: https://youtu.be/sEBg51bWkn8

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                  • #10
                    @bikerglen...Saw a bunch of references to Fort Collins. Are you in Colorado? I live in Laporte, CO just north of Fort Collins.

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                    • #11
                      Yep, I'm in Fort Collins. Small world.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by bikerglen View Post
                        Yep, I'm in Fort Collins. Small world.
                        Small world indeed! Maybe when this virus thing is over with we can get together for a beer.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by ChiefGeek63 View Post

                          Small world indeed! Maybe when this virus thing is over with we can get together for a beer.
                          That's two people now to meet afterward for beers!

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                          • #14
                            Wow! Really nice work!

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                            • #15
                              You can use through-hole components to put the leads through the holes in your proto-board then you will need to solder them to the pins and each pin to other pins to make your desired connections.

                              A quick google search for 'how to solder proto board' or similar will give you some guidance. If you've never used myloweslife.com a soldering iron before go ahead and look up guides for using one of those as well. Good luck!

                              Last edited by krespeini; 03-29-2020, 04:48 AM. Reason: spelling

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